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Letter to the editor: Turn lights on when it’s snowing

In the end you are behind the wheel and you are responsible to make sure all lights are on and functioning whether it is your vehicle or not.
winter driving

I was born and raised in the North so heavy snowfalls and cold weather don't faze me and I actually expect it. I even expect the occasional bad or new driver to cause traffic chaos and that is also nothing new but what I don't expect are the drivers who do not use their headlights in heavy snowfall or whiteout conditions. Often these drivers are running with their daylights only and are an added hazard on the road that is not needed.

The last snowfall we received is a case in point. The snow was light and fluffy and falling heavily creating a complete whiteout on the roads and area highways even at low speeds. I counted 26 cars and pickups without taillights on meaning they were using their daylights only. In essence there were 26 drivers on the road creating 26 separate driving hazards in complete whiteout conditions and having no taillights on to let drivers following know what is ahead of them that there is a vehicle there.

Those 26 drivers can use any excuse they want but at the end of the day if they get hit in whiteout conditions they are at fault. In the end you are behind the wheel and you are responsible to make sure all lights are on and functioning whether it is your vehicle or not. Do the rest of us drivers a favor and learn how to turn your headlights on which in turn turns your taillights on which in turn stops you from becoming a hazard on the road.

Dean Soiland

Prince George