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Let's hear it for the vuvuzelas

I am writing in response to your editorial the other day. I was appalled at the racist tone about the vuvuzela at the World Cup. As a South African I am very proud ofmy country to be hosting the World Cup.

I am writing in response to your editorial the other day. I was appalled at the racist tone about the vuvuzela at the World Cup. As a South African I am very proud ofmy country to be hosting the World Cup. Going into the World Cup, most of us knew that we may not win, butas a country that loves soccer the opportunity to host this game was what most people wanted and the memory will be cherished for a long time. I agree with you that the vuvuzela are a little noisy, but if you are truly a soccer fan they will not bother you. If you are watching what is happening on the field, nothing, I mean nothing, will distract you, not even the sound of bees or the stomping of buffalo.

You seem to ignore that it is not only the South Africans who are blowing the vuvuzelas, but other nations do too. Actually this very copy of the P.G. Citizen shows a Swiss fan with the vuvuzela during their match with Spain. Yesterday I was also watching the Mexico vs. France match. Their fans were blowing the vuvuzelas.

Your article did not mention any of the other teams. You were more concerned in lumping all Africans together and seemed to be rejoicing in the failure of allAfrican teams by saying the vuvuzelas will stop when Africans drop out of the competition. If indeed you are against the South African fans blowing the vuvuzela, what do you have against the rest of the African teams then? (or maybe you are just lumping us all together as is usually the case of North Americans when you refer to Africans).

As a people, we as South Africans have survived one of the most racist and brutal regimes on the planet. And guess what? We survived, and this too, shall pass. As much as your Eurocentrism is apalling, I don't expect you to like us as Africans, but I demand you respect us. Respect our culture, our drums and horns and let the the people blow their vuvuzela.

P.S. May I remind you that in the case of South Africa, it was not until 1652 when Jan van Riebeck arrived on South Africa shores that danger came upon black South Africans. And it was in 1948 when the other danger in the form of apartheid was implemented (not by Africans mind you).

Alice Skantena

Prince George