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Highest-grossing Warner Bros. movies of all time

The media company has produced 10,000 feature films, 2,400 TV shows, and has consistently made a profit of well over $1 billion annually, landing them a place among the Big Five American film studios.
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Warner Bros. has a hand in everything from film production to TV series creation, animation, comic books, and video games.

In 1903, four Polish-Jewish immigrant brothers—Harry, Albert, Sam, and Jack—pooled their money and purchased a projector and a single film reel ("The Great Train Robbery"). They began showing the film in the front yard of their small-town residence, attracting huge audiences.

Realizing how popular and profitable the venture could be, they took their setup on the road, touring other small Midwestern towns, and saving up to buy a brick-and-mortar theater. Twenty years and a small fortune in ticket sales later, the brothers decided they were ready to take the next step in the industry and established their own production company in 1923: Warner Brothers Classics of the Screen.

Today, with the studio marking its 100-year anniversary this year, Warner Bros. has a hand in everything from film production to TV series creation, animation, comic books, and video games. The media company has produced 10,000 feature films, 2,400 TV shows, and has consistently made a profit of well over $1 billion annually, landing them a place among the Big Five American film studios. Some of their most popular titles of the last several decades include popular films like "The Matrix," the "Harry Potter" franchise, "Clash of the Titans," "The Lego Movie," "Suicide Squad," and the "Dark Knight" trilogy.

Stacker compiled box office data from The Numbers on all 934 Warner Bros. movies that have been theatrically distributed and ranked in the top 50 by inflation-adjusted worldwide box office. Box office numbers were adjusted for inflation according to the year of release and the Consumer Price Index as of April 2023.

Some of the aforementioned popular titles (spoiler alert: every entry in the original "Harry Potter" series) made the list, while other inclusions might be complete shockers (there's at least one 1970s western). Read on to see how many of your favorite Warner Bros. films were major moneymakers and which ones missed the mark.

Olivia Cooke wearing a gaming helmet.

Warner Bros.

#50. Ready Player One (2018)

- Inflation-adjusted worldwide box office: $696 million
- Worldwide box office in 2018: $579.1 million
- Inflation-adjusted domestic box office: $165.5 million
- Domestic box office in 2018: $137.7 million

Steven Speilberg directed this sci-fi classic about a teenager who sets out to win a contest in a virtual world that's all but replaced society. Based on a novel of the same name by Ernest Cline, "Ready Player One" is filled with pop-culture easter eggs and jaw-dropping special effects. Tye Sheridan, Olivia Cooke, Lena Waithe, and Simon Pegg make up part of the all-star cast.

Bradley Cooper looking through the scope of a gun.

Warner Bros.

#49. American Sniper (2014)

- Inflation-adjusted worldwide box office: $697.8 million
- Worldwide box office in 2014: $547.3 million
- Inflation-adjusted domestic box office: $446.4 million
- Domestic box office in 2014: $350.1 million

Clint Eastwood's most recent contribution to the war film genre, "American Sniper" tells the story of Chris Kyle, the deadliest marksman in U.S. military history. Bradley Cooper's performance as Kyle garnered him an Oscar nomination (one of six the film earned). In addition to the critical acclaim the project won, fans also praised it for its raw and real look at the way our country treats its veterans and their families.

Carrie-Anne Moss in all black pointing a gun.

Warner Bros.

#48. The Matrix Revolutions (2003)

- Inflation-adjusted worldwide box office: $701.1 million
- Worldwide box office in 2003: $427.3 million
- Inflation-adjusted domestic box office: $228.5 million
- Domestic box office in 2003: $139.3 million

Released just six months after "The Matrix Reloaded," "The Matrix Revolutions" was the final installment in the original trilogy. The film's story follows Neo, Morpheus, and Trinity as they work to defend the last human city against the machines that have taken over the world. The Wachowskis wrote and directed the project, which starred Keanu Reeves, Laurence Fishburne, Carrie-Anne Moss, and Jada Pinkett Smith.

Jude Law and Robert Downey Jr. standing over a coffin.

Warner Bros.

#47. Sherlock Holmes (2009)

- Inflation-adjusted worldwide box office: $701.3 million
- Worldwide box office in 2009: $498.4 million
- Inflation-adjusted domestic box office: $294.1 million
- Domestic box office in 2009: $209 million

Robert Downey Jr. plays London's most famous detective in this original Sherlock Holmes story. Alongside Dr. Watson (Jude Law) and his sometimes-nemesis, sometimes-friend Irene Adler (Rachel McAdams), the detective must solve a mystery and stop a criminal plot that threatens to destroy his beloved city. Guy Ritchie directed the film, which earned two Academy Award nominations.

Robots with red eyes and guns in battle.

Warner Bros.

#46. Terminator 3: Rise of the Machines (2003)

- Inflation-adjusted worldwide box office: $710.5 million
- Worldwide box office in 2003: $433.1 million
- Inflation-adjusted domestic box office: $246.7 million
- Domestic box office in 2003: $150.4 million

Set 10 years after the events of "Terminator 2," "Terminator 3: Rise of the Machines" features an elaborate time-travel plot and the war between two highly skilled cyborgs intent on destroying each other in order to secure their opposing visions for the future. Arnold Schwarzenegger reprises his role as the titular character. James Cameron, on the other hand, didn't return as director, instead allowing Jonathan Mostow an opportunity to take the reins.

Jude Law and Robert Downey Jr. in white tie suits with cuts and bruises on their faces.

Warner Bros.

#45. Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows (2011)

- Inflation-adjusted worldwide box office: $718.8 million
- Worldwide box office in 2011: $535.7 million
- Inflation-adjusted domestic box office: $250.7 million
- Domestic box office in 2011: $186.8 million

The sequel to 2009's "Sherlock Holmes," "Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows" sees the primary cast reprise their roles, setting out to take down famed villain Professor Moriarty (Jared Harris). Guy Ritchie also directed this installment, though his efforts on the sequel earned him far less critical acclaim compared to the original.

A man in a tall black hat with a turquoise beaded band around the brim.

Warner Bros.

#44. Billy Jack (1971)

- Inflation-adjusted worldwide box office: $730.5 million
- Worldwide box office in 1971: $98 million
- Inflation-adjusted domestic box office: $730.5 million
- Domestic box office in 1971: $98 million

A married creative team, Tom Laughlin and Delores Taylor co-wrote and starred in "Billy Jack," an independent film about a Green Beret veteran and hapkido master who protects a hippie school and its countercultural students from folks in power who would rather see them disappear. Made for just $360,000, the movie bounced through three studios before Warner Bros. finally agreed to act as its distributor. Obviously a smash hit for the studio, the film was a much bigger commercial success than its sort-of prequel, "The Born Losers."

Gene Wilder and Cleavon Little in a Western setting.

Warner Bros.

#43. Blazing Saddles (1974)

- Inflation-adjusted worldwide box office: $731.5 million
- Worldwide box office in 1974: $119.5 million
- Inflation-adjusted domestic box office: $731.5 million
- Domestic box office in 1974: $119.5 million

Described by Roger Ebert as being "a crazed grab-bag of a movie," "Blazing Saddles" is an almost-plotless comedy Western that sees a Black sheriff and his drunken deputy facing off against a corrupt politician aiming to destroy their town. Mel Brooks directed the Academy Award-nominated picture that stars Cleavon Little and Gene Wilder. Shockingly, the outrageous movie almost wasn't released—according to Brooks, executives at Warners Bros. thought it would be too vulgar for audiences and suggested dumping the film and taking the loss. Thankfully, they went ahead and released it, as it would go on to be the studio's highest-grossing film in the summer of 1974.

Johnny Depp in a top hat, oversized white sunglasses and a burgundy velvet blazer.

Warner Bros.

#42. Charlie and the Chocolate Factory (2005)

- Inflation-adjusted worldwide box office: $735.4 million
- Worldwide box office in 2005: $475.8 million
- Inflation-adjusted domestic box office: $319.1 million
- Domestic box office in 2005: $206.5 million

The most recent adaptation of Roald Dahl's 1964 classic children's novel, this version of "Charlie and the Chocolate Factory" is also the most commercially successful. Freddie Highmore plays the eponymous poverty-stricken, golden ticket winner who inherits the bizarre candy empire from its equally strange owner, Willy Wonka (Johnny Depp). The musical has a much darker tone than many of its predecessors, largely thanks to director Tim Burton, who's famous for his more twisted takes on classic stories.

Harrison Ford with a beard and slicked back hair in a suit.

Warner Bros.

#41. The Fugitive (1993)

- Inflation-adjusted worldwide box office: $739.1 million
- Worldwide box office in 1993: $353.7 million
- Inflation-adjusted domestic box office: $384.2 million
- Domestic box office in 1993: $183.9 million

After being wrongly accused of the murder of his wife, surgeon-turned-fugitive Richard Kimble (Harrison Ford) sets out to discover her real killer while evading a team of U.S. Marshals, led by the relentless Samuel Gerard (Tommy Lee Jones). The thriller was directed by Andrew Davis and Jones' performance garnered him an Oscar for Best Supporting Actor. The film led to a spinoff titled "U.S. Marshals" which saw Jones reprise his role.

Tom Cruise, Shun Sugata, and Ken Watanabe walking up a hill with horses in the background.

Warner Bros.

#40. The Last Samurai (2003)

- Inflation-adjusted worldwide box office: $749.5 million
- Worldwide box office in 2003: $456.8 million
- Inflation-adjusted domestic box office: $182.3 million
- Domestic box office in 2003: $111.1 million

In "The Last Samurai," Tom Cruise plays a 19th-century American military officer who's hired by the Japanese emperor to modernize—and Westernize—the country's military. While knee-deep in his mission, Cruise's character becomes impressed by the samurais he's been hired to eliminate and begins to rethink his entire approach. Edward Zwick directed the lauded historical epic.

Judy Garland talking to a scarecrow and a tinman.

Warner Bros.

#39. The Wizard of Oz (1939)

- Inflation-adjusted worldwide box office: $758.4 million
- Worldwide box office in 1939: $34.9 million
- Inflation-adjusted domestic box office: $752.7 million
- Domestic box office in 1939: $34.7 million

Believe it or not, "The Wizard of Oz" was classified as a box office failure when the classic musical was first released back in 1939. Its outsized budget—which went to the salaries of its many actors (led by Judy Garland, Ray Bolger, Bert Lahr, Jack Haley, Billie Burke, and Margaret Hamilton), special effects, and elaborate sets—meant that the film would have had to have been a runaway success to make a profit, and it just wasn't. It would take 20 years, and plenty of rereleases and TV airings, for it to finally make back its original allowance. While MGM originally released the film, Warner Bros. distributed the film theatrically when it was rereleased in 1998.

Brad Pitt, George Clooney, Don Cheadle, Matt Damon, and Elliott Gould.

Warner Bros.

#38. Ocean's Eleven (2001)

- Inflation-adjusted worldwide box office: $768.3 million
- Worldwide box office in 2001: $450.7 million
- Inflation-adjusted domestic box office: $312.7 million
- Domestic box office in 2001: $183.4 million

A remake of the Rat Pack original, "Ocean's Eleven" introduced audiences to a new gang of attractive, larger-than-life criminal masterminds. George Clooney, Brad Pitt, Matt Damon, Bernie Mac, Casey Affleck, Elliott Gould, Scott Caan, Eddie Jemison, Don Cheadle, Qin Shaobo, and Carl Reiner all star in this film about a gang of con artists who set out to rob three Vegas casinos in one night. Steven Soderbergh directed the massive commercial hit that was so successful it inspired two sequels and an all-female spinoff.

Brad Pitt dressed in Trojan armor on horseback.

Warner Bros.

#37. Troy (2004)

- Inflation-adjusted worldwide box office: $772.1 million
- Worldwide box office in 2004: $483.2 million
- Inflation-adjusted domestic box office: $213 million
- Domestic box office in 2004: $133.3 million

The second Brad Pitt-led movie to make the list, "Troy" is an epic war drama loosely based on Homer's "Iliad." Eric Bana, Sean Bean, and Orlando Bloom are also featured in the project which was praised for its incredible sets and costume design. However, not everyone was blown away by the period drama—a large portion of the audience complained that the film's lack of faithfulness to its source material left something to be desired.

Johnny Depp with white hair and Poppy Corby-Tuech in all black standing on a street with an old car whizzing by behind them.

Warner Bros.

#36. Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes of Grindelwald (2018)

- Inflation-adjusted worldwide box office: $779.4 million
- Worldwide box office in 2018: $648.5 million
- Inflation-adjusted domestic box office: $191.8 million
- Domestic box office in 2018: $159.6 million

The second installment in the "Fantastic Beasts" franchise, "The Crimes of Grindelwald" follows the exploits of magizoologist Newt Scamander. Eddie Redmayne stars as the primary character with Johnny Depp, Jude Law, Zoë Kravitz, Ezra Miller, and plenty of other big names rounding out the cast. Although the movie received mixed reviews, and was the lowest-grossing Wizarding World installment at the time, it still managed to garner two BAFTA nominations.

Bradley Cooper, Zach Galifianakis, Mason Lee, and Ed Helms with scared looks on their faces in a speed boat.

Warner Bros.

#35. The Hangover Part II (2011)

- Inflation-adjusted worldwide box office: $787.4 million
- Worldwide box office in 2011: $586.8 million
- Inflation-adjusted domestic box office: $341.5 million
- Domestic box office in 2011: $254.5 million

Two years after the Las Vegas bachelor party that almost ended in disaster, the same unlikely group of friends reunites to send another one of them off into marriage, this time in Thailand. Bradley Cooper, Zach Galifianakis, Ed Helms, Justin Bartha, Ken Jeong, and Mike Tyson all reprise their roles in the off-color comedy, which was directed by Todd Phillips. While the film managed to sell a good quantity of tickets, many fans and critics alike complained that it was far too similar to the first installment, and lacked the originality that made "The Hangover" such a massive hit.

Robert Pattinson as Batman and Zoë Kravitz in all black leather next to a motorcycle.

Warner Bros.

#34. The Batman (2022)

- Inflation-adjusted worldwide box office: $790.4 million
- Worldwide box office in 2022: $766.3 million
- Inflation-adjusted domestic box office: $380.9 million
- Domestic box office in 2022: $369.3 million

Robert Pattinson plays the caped crusader in this 2022 iteration of the Batman story. In the Matt Reeves-directed installment, the titular superhero, operating more like a detective, discovers a web of corruption when attempting to track down the Riddler (Paul Dano), and is forced to team up with the morally gray Catwoman (Zoë Kravitz) to put things right. Critics declared the film one of the darkest and most psychologically thrilling chapters in the superhero's saga, praising the way it provided a more intimate portrait of the man at the heart of it all.

Ben Affleck, Jason Momoa, Gal Gadot, Ezra Miller, and Ray Fisher in various superhero costumes.

Warner Bros.

#33. Justice League (2017)

- Inflation-adjusted worldwide box office: $807.7 million
- Worldwide box office in 2017: $655.9 million
- Inflation-adjusted domestic box office: $282 million
- Domestic box office in 2017: $229 million

Initially directed by Zack Snyder and later reworked and completed by Joss Whedon, this live-action "Justice League" was many years in the making. Between trying to coordinate the busy schedules of its ensemble cast (Ben Affleck, Henry Cavill, Amy Adams, Gal Gadot, Ezra Miller, Jason Momoa, and Ray Fisher), budget concerns, and other production delays, it seemed, at certain points, that the film would never make it to the big screen. The studio pushed the film through with Whedon's cut but in 2021, Snyder released his version to fans' delight with this story about the superhero team coming together to defend Earth against Steppenwolf and his Darkseid's conquest.

Keanu Reeves and Carrie-Anne Moss in all black walking with guns.

Warner Bros.

#32. The Matrix (1999)

- Inflation-adjusted worldwide box office: $844.3 million
- Worldwide box office in 1999: $466 million
- Inflation-adjusted domestic box office: $315.3 million
- Domestic box office in 1999: $174 million

A massive critical and commercial success, "The Matrix" unquestionably changed the type of stories Hollywood was telling and the way in which it told them. A science-fiction action film set in a dystopian future where a computer-controlled simulated reality has replaced actual reality, the story follows a group of rebels as they attempt to fight the machine's control. Keanu Reeves, Laurence Fishburne, and Carrie-Anne Moss star in the often-parodied Wachowskis picture.

Will Smith with a gun walking through an overgrown downtown.

Warner Bros.

#31. I Am Legend (2007)

- Inflation-adjusted worldwide box office: $852.4 million
- Worldwide box office in 2007: $585.5 million
- Inflation-adjusted domestic box office: $373.2 million
- Domestic box office in 2007: $256.4 million

In 2007, more than a decade after Warner Bros. began development on it, "I Am Legend" finally hit the big screen. Loosely based on a Richard Matheson novel, the movie directed by Francis Lawrence follows a lone U.S. Army veteran and virologist as he attempts to navigate a post-apocalyptic New York City. Will Smith stars in the sci-fi action thriller, which features one of the most expensive single scenes ever filmed (amounting to at least $5 million).

A scary clown in a church.

Warner Bros.

#30. It (2017)

- Inflation-adjusted worldwide box office: $863.2 million
- Worldwide box office in 2017: $701 million
- Inflation-adjusted domestic box office: $404.9 million
- Domestic box office in 2017: $328.8 million

This bone-chilling horror film is, of course, based on the classic Stephen King novel of the same name. Widely considered to be one of the best King adaptations of all time, the project is lauded for its writing, atmosphere, cinematography, musical score, and performances. Bill Skarsgård and Jaeden Martell are the lead actors, with a half-dozen other up-and-coming names—like Finn Wolfhard, Jack Dylan Grazer, and Sophia Lillis—in supporting roles.

Kevin Costner pointing a bow and arrow.

Warner Bros.

#29. Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves (1991)

- Inflation-adjusted worldwide box office: $865.5 million
- Worldwide box office in 1991: $390.5 million
- Inflation-adjusted domestic box office: $366.8 million
- Domestic box office in 1991: $165.5 million

This retelling of the Robin Hood legend stands apart from all the rest thanks to its casting alone. Kevin Costner, Morgan Freeman, Christian Slater, Alan Rickman, and Mary Elizabeth Mastrantonio are the film's main actors, and their performances sang under the direction of Kevin Reynolds. Even if you haven't seen this cult classic, you're likely familiar with its Academy Award-nominated theme song, "(Everything I Do) I Do It For You" by Bryan Adams.

Superman standing in the middle of the street.

Warner Bros.

#28. Man of Steel (2013)

- Inflation-adjusted worldwide box office: $865.5 million
- Worldwide box office in 2013: $668 million
- Inflation-adjusted domestic box office: $377.1 million
- Domestic box office in 2013: $291 million

A reboot of the Superman franchise, "Man of Steel" is the superhero's origin story. Directed by Zack Snyder, the movie stars Henry Cavill as Superman and Amy Adams as Lois Lane, along with an ensemble cast that includes Michael Shannon, Kevin Costner, Diane Lane, Laurence Fishburne, and Russell Crowe. While critics bemoaned its stereotypical plot beats and action sequences, audiences loved its fast pace and careful treatment of beloved material.

Kevin Costner and Whitney Houston smiling at each other.

Warner Bros.

#27. The Bodyguard (1992)

- Inflation-adjusted worldwide box office: $884.1 million
- Worldwide box office in 1992: $411 million
- Inflation-adjusted domestic box office: $262.4 million
- Domestic box office in 1992: $122 million

"The Bodyguard," a romantic drama about a former Secret Service member (Kevin Costner) hired to protect a famous actress from her crazed stalker, marked Whitney Houston's acting debut. While critics weren't wowed by her acting chops, the soundtrack (which is all Houston songs) was another story. Case in point: Her most famous single of all time, "I Will Always Love You"—a cover version of the country track written by Dolly Parton—is featured in the movie.

Sandra Bullock and George Clooney floating in space suits with planet Earth below.

Warner Bros.

#26. Gravity (2013)

- Inflation-adjusted worldwide box office: $888.4 million
- Worldwide box office in 2013: $685.7 million
- Inflation-adjusted domestic box office: $355.1 million
- Domestic box office in 2013: $274.1 million

Alfonso Cuaron wrote and directed this sci-fi thriller about two astronauts (Sandra Bullock and George Clooney) who work together to return to Earth after their space shuttle is destroyed. At the time of the movie's release, its visual effects were some of the most advanced and innovative out there. A smash hit with critics and audiences alike, the film was nominated for dozens of awards—winning seven Oscars, including Best Director—and topped nearly every year-end best-of list out there.

Will Smith and Margot Robbie talking in the street.

Warner Bros.

#25. Suicide Squad (2016)

- Inflation-adjusted worldwide box office: $937.8 million
- Worldwide box office in 2016: $745.7 million
- Inflation-adjusted domestic box office: $408.8 million
- Domestic box office in 2016: $325.1 million

A true antihero story, "Suicide Squad" is a DC Extended Universe film that follows a group of villains who find themselves in the unique position of saving the world. The ensemble cast included big names like Will Smith, Jared Leto, Margot Robbie, Viola Davis, Cara Delevingne, and David Harbour. While critics largely panned the film, audiences clearly didn't agree, spending close to $1 billion on tickets worldwide.

Helen Hunt and Bill Paxton in a windy cornfield looking up into the sky.

Warner Bros.

#24. Twister (1996)

- Inflation-adjusted worldwide box office: $953.9 million
- Worldwide box office in 1996: $495.7 million
- Inflation-adjusted domestic box office: $465.1 million
- Domestic box office in 1996: $241.7 million

In this epic disaster film, a couple on the brink of divorce (Helen Hunt and Bill Paxton) must make amends so that they can deploy a high-tech research device right in the middle of a life-threatening outbreak of tornadoes. Written by Michael Crichton and Anne-Marie Martin, produced by Steven Spielberg (among others), and directed by Jan de Bont, the movie had all the makings of a summer blockbuster. And while viewers flocked to see the fast-paced action flick (and its jaw-dropping special effects) some critics disliked it, considering it to be generic and formulaic.

Michael Keaton as Batman.

Warner Bros.

#23. Batman (1989)

- Inflation-adjusted worldwide box office: $1.002 billion
- Worldwide box office in 1989: $411.3 million
- Inflation-adjusted domestic box office: $611.6 million
- Domestic box office in 1989: $251.2 million

The first Batman movie Warner Bros. ever made, this 1989 superhero film starred Michael Keaton as the caped crusader, Jack Nicholson as his nemesis the Joker, and Kim Basinger as his love interest Vicki Vale. Set early in Batman's crime-fighting career, it largely focuses on the origins of his dispute with his archnemesis. Directed by Tim Burton, the film is often credited as being the originator of Hollywood's current superhero craze.

Gal Gadot as Wonder Woman.

Warner Bros.

#22. Wonder Woman (2017)

- Inflation-adjusted worldwide box office: $1.007 billion
- Worldwide box office in 2017: $817.7 million
- Inflation-adjusted domestic box office: $508 million
- Domestic box office in 2017: $412.6 million

After spending years floundering in development hell, "Wonder Woman" finally got its day in 2017. A spinoff of "Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice," the film starred Gal Gadot as the Amazon princess and focuses on her attempts to stop World War I. The summer blockbuster was incredibly popular with critics and even managed to generate a small amount of award buzz.

Leonardo DiCaprio and Elliot Page standing in the doorway of an old gate.

Warner Bros.

#21. Inception (2010)

- Inflation-adjusted worldwide box office: $1.008 billion
- Worldwide box office in 2010: $728.5 million
- Inflation-adjusted domestic box office: $405 million
- Domestic box office in 2010: $292.6 million

A bizarre, twisty thriller, Christopher Nolan's "Inception" involves planting memories and stealing secrets through the dreams of unsuspecting individuals. Described as one of the best movies of the decade, it was nominated for eight Academy Awards and took home four, including for its surreal visual effects. Leonardo DiCaprio, Joseph Gordon-Levitt, Marion Cotillard, Elliot Page, Tom Hardy, Cillian Murphy, Ken Watanabe, and Michael Caine all starred in the movie.

Eddie Redmayne holding a little plant character dancing on his hand.

Warner Bros.

#20. Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them (2016)

- Inflation-adjusted worldwide box office: $1.021 billion
- Worldwide box office in 2016: $811.7 million
- Inflation-adjusted domestic box office: $294.3 million
- Domestic box office in 2016: $234 million

The first Wizarding World film to come out after the "Harry Potter" franchise wrapped, "Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them" is actually a prequel to J.K. Rowling's original series. Focusing on the life of Newt Scamander (a wizard whose textbook features prominently in the world of Harry Potter), the fantasy is largely set in New York City. Several big names, including Eddie Redmayne, Colin Farrell, and Johnny Depp starred in the film, while David Yates (who helmed several "Harry Potter" movies) directed.

Ben Affleck as Batman and Henry Cavill as Superman face to face.

Warner Bros.

#19. Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice (2016)

- Inflation-adjusted worldwide box office: $1.097 billion
- Worldwide box office in 2016: $872.4 million
- Inflation-adjusted domestic box office: $415.5 million
- Domestic box office in 2016: $330.4 million

Yet another superhero film directed by Zach Snyder, "Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice" sees the two heroes face off thanks to some crafty manipulation by Lex Luthor. Ben Affleck and Henry Cavill star in the two primary roles, and Gal Gadot makes her first on-screen appearance in her role as Wonder Woman. Despite its box office pull, the critically panned film was considered a failure by the studio, which expected the film to bring in over $1 billion in ticket sales.

Martin Freeman looking at a ring.

Warner Bros.

#18. The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies (2014)

- Inflation-adjusted worldwide box office: $1.199 billion
- Worldwide box office in 2014: $940.3 million
- Inflation-adjusted domestic box office: $325.3 million
- Domestic box office in 2014: $255.1 million

The final installment in "The Hobbit" trilogy, "The Battle of the Five Armies" covers the portion of J.R.R. Tolkien's famous story that goes from the capture of the treasure beneath the Lonely Mountain through the wars at the end of the novel. Directed by Peter Jackson, the film had a massive cast that included Martin Freeman, Ian McKellen, Richard Armitage, Evangeline Lilly, Luke Evans, Benedict Cumberbatch, Cate Blanchett, and Orlando Bloom. By and large, fans and critics were satisfied (if a bit underwhelmed) by the conclusion to the fantasy tale.

Keanu Reeves in all black surrounded by television screens of his mirror image.

Warner Bros.

#17. The Matrix Reloaded (2003)

- Inflation-adjusted worldwide box office: $1.212 billion
- Worldwide box office in 2003: $738.6 million
- Inflation-adjusted domestic box office: $462 million
- Domestic box office in 2003: $281.6 million

The most financially successful of the original "Matrix" trilogy, "The Matrix Reloaded" was the highest-grossing R-rated film for over a decade. Bringing back the original cast (Keanu Reeves, Laurence Fishburne, Carrie-Anne Moss, Hugo Weaving, Gloria Foster) alongside new faces like Jada Pinkett Smith, the movie followed the rebels as they continued the fight against the machines. Critics raved about the Wachowskis' perfect combination of thrilling fight scenes and intelligent themes, considering it among the strongest films of that year.

Ian McKellen dressed as a wizard.

Warner Bros.

#16. The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug (2013)

- Inflation-adjusted worldwide box office: $1.243 billion
- Worldwide box office in 2013: $959.4 million
- Inflation-adjusted domestic box office: $334.6 million
- Domestic box office in 2013: $258.2 million

The second installment in "The Hobbit" trilogy, "The Desolation of Smaug" is primarily a road movie. It follows Bilbo Baggins (Martin Freeman), Thorin Oakenshield (Richard Armitage), and the rest of the dwarves as they set out on a journey across Middle-earth to the Lonely Mountain. The movie's visual effects and sound achievements are stunning, earning it multiple Academy Award nominations.

Daniel Radcliffe holding onto a giant bird's beak.

Warner Bros.

#15. Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban (2004)

- Inflation-adjusted worldwide box office: $1.262 billion
- Worldwide box office in 2004: $789.6 million
- Inflation-adjusted domestic box office: $399.1 million
- Domestic box office in 2004: $249.8 million

The lowest-grossing (but one of the best-reviewed) installment in the original "Harry Potter" franchise, "The Prisoner of Azkaban" still managed to pull in well over $1 billion in ticket sales. Set during the trio's third year at Hogwarts, the Alfonso Cuarón-directed movie follows the gang as they try to unravel the mystery of Harry's past and connection to an escaped Azkaban prisoner. While the cast remained largely the same, the film is notable for being the first time Michael Gambon appeared in the role of Dumbledore (following the death of the original actor, Richard Harris).

Joaquin Phoenix with clown makeup on in a red jacket looking in a mirror.

Warner Bros.

#14. Joker (2019)

- Inflation-adjusted worldwide box office: $1.262 billion
- Worldwide box office in 2019: $1.069 billion
- Inflation-adjusted domestic box office: $396 million
- Domestic box office in 2019: $335.5 million

A stand-alone origin story for one of DC's biggest villains, "Joker" stars Joaquin Pheonix, Robert De Niro, Zazie Beetz, and Frances Conroy. Set in the early 1980s, the movie follows Arthur Fleck (aka the Joker), a failed clown and standup comedian, whose descent into madness and nihilism turns him into Gotham City's biggest danger. For his role as the deranged villain, Phoenix won an Academy Award for Best Actor.

Michael Gambon and Daniel Radcliffe shining flashlights at night in a room.

Warner Bros.

#13. Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince (2009)

- Inflation-adjusted worldwide box office: $1.308 billion
- Worldwide box office in 2009: $929.4 million
- Inflation-adjusted domestic box office: $425 million
- Domestic box office in 2009: $302.1 million

Directed by David Yates, "Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince" is the sixth installment in the series. It follows a more mature Harry as he navigates his penultimate year at Hogwarts, falls in love, and works out the mystery surrounding a cryptically inscribed textbook. Released in 54 markets concurrently, the movie broke records at the time as the highest-grossing international opening of all time.

Daniel Radcliffe and Emma Watson standing on a rocky mountain top.

Warner Bros.

#12. Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1 (2010)

- Inflation-adjusted worldwide box office: $1.317 billion
- Worldwide box office in 2010: $951.8 million
- Inflation-adjusted domestic box office: $409.9 million
- Domestic box office in 2010: $296.1 million

The seventh installment in the Harry Potter film series, "Deathly Hallows: Part 1" covers the first half of J.K. Rowling's seventh book. The action in this David Yates-directed installment largely consists of the core trio (Daniel Radcliffe, Emma Watson, Rupert Grint) traveling around discovering and destroying Horcruxes and learning about the titular Deathly Hallows. The action ends in a cliffhanger, leaving audiences perfectly primed for the final chapter which would hit theaters just a year later.

Martin Freeman running through a green valley.

Warner Bros.

#11. The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey (2012)

- Inflation-adjusted worldwide box office: $1.334 billion
- Worldwide box office in 2012: $1.015 billion
- Inflation-adjusted domestic box office: $398.4 million
- Domestic box office in 2012: $303 million

Set 60 years before the events of "The Lord of the Rings" series, "The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey" is the first in a trilogy of films based on J.R.R. Tolkien's classic children's novel. In this chapter, Bilbo Baggins (Martin Freeman) is sent by Gandalf (Ian McKellen) to accompany 13 dwarves on a journey across Middle-earth that will ultimately result in the collection of a massive amount of treasure. Clocking in at nearly three hours, this installment is the longest in the "Hobbit" trilogy.

Rupert Grint, Daniel Radcliffe, and Emma Watson in a dark forest looking up at something.

Warner Bros.

#10. Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix (2007)

- Inflation-adjusted worldwide box office: $1.368 billion
- Worldwide box office in 2007: $939.6 million
- Inflation-adjusted domestic box office: $425.3 million
- Domestic box office in 2007: $292.1 million

The stakes are raised in "Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix" after the return of Lord Voldemort at the close of the previous film. Directed by David Yates, the movie marked the first appearance of Imelda Staunton as the despicable Dolores Umbridge and Evanna Lynch as Luna Lovegood. Although it was the fifth installment in the franchise, the film managed to avoid a mid-series slump and still earned critical acclaim as well as several major award nominations.

Daniel Radcliffe and Robert Pattinson.

Warner Bros.

#9. Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire (2005)

- Inflation-adjusted worldwide box office: $1.371 billion
- Worldwide box office in 2005: $886.7 million
- Inflation-adjusted domestic box office: $448.5 million
- Domestic box office in 2005: $290.2 million

One of the best-reviewed installments in the franchise, "Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire" earned praise for its increased level of sophistication, the performances of its actors, and its stunning visual effects. Directed by Mike Newell, this fourth chapter follows the Hogwarts students as they compete in the Triwizard Tournament against participants from two other wizarding academies. Brendan Gleeson, Robert Pattinson, David Tennant, Roger Lloyd Pack, Katie Leung, Clémence Poésy, and several other actors joined the cast at this juncture.

Jason Momoa as Aquaman.

Warner Bros.

#8. Aquaman (2018)

- Inflation-adjusted worldwide box office: $1.375 billion
- Worldwide box office in 2018: $1.144 billion
- Inflation-adjusted domestic box office: $402.7 million
- Domestic box office in 2018: $335.1 million

Jason Momoa stars as the king of Atlantis in this DC Universe story. The unlikely heir to the underwater kingdom, the metahuman must act quickly to prevent an all-out war between residents of the sea and those on land. Amber Heard, Patrick Wilson, Willem Dafoe, Dolph Lundgren, Yahya Abdul-Mateen II, and Nicole Kidman round out the cast of the James Wan-directed feature.

Christopher Reeve, as Superman, with a city skyline in the background.

Warner Bros.

#7. Superman (1978)

- Inflation-adjusted worldwide box office: $1.389 billion
- Worldwide box office in 1978: $300.2 million
- Inflation-adjusted domestic box office: $621.1 million
- Domestic box office in 1978: $134.2 million

At the time of its release, "Superman" was the most expensive movie ever made, checking in at just over $55 million. The first superhero story to ever hit the big screen after "The Shadow Strikes", it was wildly popular and responsible for launching the DC and Marvel film franchises we know and love today. Directed by Richard Donner, the movie focuses on the origin story and early years of Superman's (Christopher Reeve) crime-fighting career, particularly his rivalry with Lex Luthor (Gene Hackman). Marlon Brando, Jackie Cooper, Ned Beatty, Glenn Ford, and Margot Kidder round out the cast.

Christian Bale in a black Batman costume.

Warner Bros.

#6. The Dark Knight (2008)

- Inflation-adjusted worldwide box office: $1.411 billion
- Worldwide box office in 2008: $1.006 billion
- Inflation-adjusted domestic box office: $750 million
- Domestic box office in 2008: $535 million

Christopher Nolan's follow-up to "Batman Begins" (which just missed the list), "The Dark Knight" brings back Christian Bale as the defender of Gotham City. In this chapter of the story, Batman faces off against the Joker (Heath Ledger in one of his last film roles, for which he posthumously won an Oscar) with the help of James Gordon (Gary Oldman). Maggie Gyllenhaal, Michael Caine, Aaron Eckhart, and Morgan Freeman round out the cast.

Christian Bale and Anne Hathaway dancing at a masquerade ball.

Warner Bros.

#5. The Dark Knight Rises (2012)

- Inflation-adjusted worldwide box office: $1.423 billion
- Worldwide box office in 2012: $1.082 billion
- Inflation-adjusted domestic box office: $589.2 million
- Domestic box office in 2012: $448.1 million

Set eight years after "The Dark Knight," "The Dark Knight Rises" follows Batman (Christian Bale) as he's forced out of retirement to take down Bane (Tom Hardy) with the help of Catwoman (Anne Hathaway). The movie marked the conclusion of Christopher Nolan's trilogy, and was, at least financially, the most successful installment.

Tom Felton and Daniel Radcliffe flying on broomsticks.

Warner Bros.

#4. Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets (2002)

- Inflation-adjusted worldwide box office: $1.468 billion
- Worldwide box office in 2002: $875. million
- Inflation-adjusted domestic box office: $440 million
- Domestic box office in 2002: $262.2 million

When an ancient prophecy seems to be coming true, Harry Potter sets out to discover what's really turning his fellow Hogwarts students into stone. Set during the wizard's second year at the magical school, the movie was directed by Chris Columbus and adopts a slightly darker tone than the first film.

Daniel Radcliffe holding a wand.

Warner Bros.

#3. Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone (2001)

- Inflation-adjusted worldwide box office: $1.645 billion
- Worldwide box office in 2001: $965 million
- Inflation-adjusted domestic box office: $541.8 million
- Domestic box office in 2001: $317.9 million

"Yer a wizard, Harry!" The first installment in the Harry Potter series, "The Sorcerer's Stone" follows an ordinary young boy as he realizes he comes from magical stock. Starring newcomers Daniel Radcliffe, Emma Watson, Rupert Grint, and Tom Felton alongside more established veterans like John Cleese, Robbie Coltrane, John Hurt, Richard Harris, Alan Rickman, and Maggie Smith, the film's enchanting and upbeat tone delighted audiences.

Warwick Davis, Rupert Grint, Daniel Radcliffe, and Emma Watson standing outside of a tunnel on a cliff.

Warner Bros.

#2. Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2 (2011)

- Inflation-adjusted worldwide box office: $1.766 billion
- Worldwide box office in 2011: $1.316 billion
- Inflation-adjusted domestic box office: $511.5 million
- Domestic box office in 2011: $381.2 million

The final installment in the "Harry Potter" series, "Deathly Hallows: Part 2" brings the battle for the Wizarding World to a satisfying end. Packed with big action sequences and heartbreaking moments, the David Yates-directed project was far and away the most popular with fans of the story. Everything from the performances to the special effects to the music and cinematography earned praise from those in the industry, and the movie was nominated for three Academy Awards.

A silhouette of a man in a hat standing in front of a house on a foggy night.

Warner Bros.

#1. The Exorcist (1973)

- Inflation-adjusted worldwide box office: $2.911 billion
- Worldwide box office in 1973: $428.2 million
- Inflation-adjusted domestic box office: $1.566 billion
- Domestic box office in 1973: $230.3 million

Finally, the highest-grossing Warner Bros. movie of all time is "The Exorcist," a supernatural horror film about the demonic possession of a young girl. Directed by William Friedkin and adapted for the screen by William Peter Blatty, who wrote the novel of the same name, the movie starred Ellen Burstyn, Linda Blair, Max von Sydow, and Jason Miller.

Despite, or perhaps because of, the rumors that the project was cursed, fans flocked to see it in theaters, reportedly having such visceral reactions to what they were seeing on screen that they'd get sick or pass out. Still thought to be one of the best horror movies ever made, it was the first of that genre to be nominated for an Academy Award for Best Picture.

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