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Online survey of COVID-19 mental health seeks participants

A new online survey by researchers at BC Children’s Hospital, the University of British Columbia (UBC) and Simon Fraser University (SFU) aims to better understand how the COVID-19 pandemic has impacted the mental health of children, youth, adults and parents.
COVID-19 online survey
A new online survey by researchers at BC Children’s Hospital, the University of British Columbia (UBC) and Simon Fraser University (SFU) aims to better understand how the COVID-19 pandemic has impacted the mental health of children, youth, adults and parents.

A new online survey by researchers at BC Children’s Hospital, the University of British Columbia (UBC) and Simon Fraser University (SFU) aims to better understand how the COVID-19 pandemic has impacted the mental health of children, youth, adults and parents.

Study co-leads Dr. S. Evelyn Stewart, director of psychiatry research at BC Children’s, and Dr. Hasina Samji, an affiliate investigator with BC Children’s and assistant professor with SFU’s faculty of health sciences, want to gauge how the pandemic affects people’s feelings, thoughts and actions over time, to learn how they manage and what resources they find helpful.

“This research has the potential to transform the lives of children and families across the province who are struggling with unmet mental health care needs,” said Stewart, who is also a psychiatry professor in UBC’s faculty of medicine. “We will provide decision-makers with rigorous evidence to guide clinical and policy decisions for this and future pandemics.”

All children and youth over the age of seven are invited to fill in a 20 to 30-minute online survey about their experiences. Parents are asked to share the experiences of one or all of their children, which takes an additional 20 minutes per child. The researchers are keen to hear directly from young people, whose voices have been missing so far from the conversation. They would also especially like to hear from families and young people from under-served and under-represented communities.

Clinical and community partners at BC Children’s, Ray-Cam Co-operative Centre and the YWCA are among those who have already distributed the survey to families as part of a soft launch.

Samji, who is also a senior scientist at the BC Centre for Disease Control, says the pandemic has been a marathon, not a sprint, and she knows many children, youth and families are struggling.

“We hope we can make a difference to improve people’s mental well-being now and in the future,” she says. “There is widespread recognition that we need to measure mental well-being at the population level and in groups that may be disproportionately affected by the pandemic. We are grateful for the support of many stakeholders in our work including the Ministry of Health, which has provided seed funding.”

With the official launch of the survey, researchers are hoping for a minimum of 3,000 respondents. The survey is open to everyone, everywhere, with the greatest focus on residents of B.C. and families with children and teens.

To learn more about the Personal Impacts of COVID-19 Survey visit: http://bcchr.info/38dN97J.