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Latest Minnesota news, sports, business and entertainment at 3:20 p.m. CDT

DAUNTE WRIGHT-OFFICER Ex-cop who killed Daunte Wright lays out possible defense MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — A former suburban Minneapolis police officer who has said she meant to use a Taser instead of a handgun when she shot and killed Daunte Wright in April

DAUNTE WRIGHT-OFFICER

Ex-cop who killed Daunte Wright lays out possible defense

MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — A former suburban Minneapolis police officer who has said she meant to use a Taser instead of a handgun when she shot and killed Daunte Wright in April is laying out her potential defenses. Former Brooklyn Center Officer Kim Potter's trial is set to start Nov. 30. Attorneys for Potter said in documents made public Thursday that they may argue that Wright's death was an innocent accident or an innocent mistake. They also may argue that Potter's perceived use of a Taser was reasonable. Potter is white and Wright was Black. She fatally shot the 20-year-old during a traffic stop. The defense is also asking that the first-degree and second-degree manslaughter charges be dismissed.

MODIFIED GUNS-MINNEAPOLIS

Modified weapons showing up at more Minneapolis crime scenes

MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — Authorities say handguns and rifles that have been modified into fully automatic weapons that can fire up to 1,200 rounds per minute have been involved in a string of Minneapolis shootings and have been showing up at more crime scenes. Police data show the city’s ShotSpotter network has recorded 78 automatic gunfire activations of 935 total rounds, compared with five such activations of 42 rounds at this time last year. It’s not clear how many converted weapons are on city streets, but authorities say they have been tracking incidents involving them.

SCHOOL BUS CRASH-CLAY COUNTY

4 students hurt in northwestern Minnesota school bus crash

MOORHEAD, Minn. (AP) — Four children were taken to the hospital with injuries that were not life-threatening after the school bus they were riding in crashed with a pickup truck in northwestern Minnesota’s Clay County. Sheriff Mark Empting said the crash happened at about 7:30 a.m. Thursday in rural Clay County. Empting said the preliminary investigation shows the driver of the pickup truck may have failed to yield, but the investigation is ongoing. The school bus was equipped with a camera, which will be used in the investigation. The bus was carrying students from the Ada-Borup School District. 

CONVICTED WOMAN-DEPORTATION

Walz asks ICE to stop deportation of woman who sought pardon

MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — Gov. Tim Walz is asking officials with U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement to stop deportation proceedings for a woman he says will be in grave danger if she is returned to her native Ethiopia. Amreya Shefa was convicted of manslaughter for fatally stabbing her husband in 2013 in an act that she described as self-defense after she said he held her prisoner in her home and repeatedly raped her. Shefa sought a pardon, which Walz supported, but it was not granted. Now, Walz is asking ICE to “administratively close” removal proceedings while officials consider her applications for nonimmigrant status for crime victims. A spokesperson for ICE declined to comment.

PHOTO FLAP

Attorney: Photo business that closed working with customers

BISMARCK, N.D. (AP) — An attorney for a North Dakota photography business that abruptly went out of business and left many wedding couples in limbo says the company is working to release photos and images, It’s unclear whether customers who paid in advance for uncompleted work will be refunded. Two state agencies are investigating the shutdown of Glasser Images last week and the business owner is facing several lawsuits. Fargo attorney Tim O’Keeffe said the photos and videos are being secured and “kept safely” on hard drives, but it’s a “logistical challenge” to get them to customers and it could take weeks. Glasser Images photographed weddings throughout the Dakotas, Minnesota and Colorado without charging for travel costs, according to the company website.

MEDICAL MARIJUANA-MINNESOTA

Minnesota court: Workers' comp can't cover medical marijuana

MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — The Minnesota Supreme Court says workers’ compensation for injured employees doesn’t cover medical marijuana because the drug remains illegal under federal law. The high court issued a pair of rulings Wednesday that overturned lower court orders for employers to pay for medical marijuana to treat work-related injuries. Federal law prohibits the prescribing and possession of marijuana regardless of state laws authorizing it. The court says that blocks employers from being required to pay for medical cannabis. Justice Margaret Chutich wrote in dissent that the effect is to prevent injured workers who suffer intractable pain from receiving the relief medical cannabis can bring. 

SHOOTING-MISTAKEN IDENTITY

Man charged with homicide in possible case of wrong identity

BRAINERD, Minn. (AP) — A Brainerd man is facing a homicide charge after he allegedly shot a woman he may have thought was his ex-girlfriend. The Minneapolis Star Tribune reports that 29-year-old Cameron Moser was charged Monday in Crow Wing County with second-degree intentional murder in connection with 46-year-old Bethany Bernatsky's death. Police found her body in a resort cabin near Nisswa on Thursday. Sheriff Scott Goddard says investigators believe Moser may have meant to shoot his ex-girlfriend and mistook Bernatsky for her. Both women's families say they resemble each other. 

LOST OWL

Minnesota Zoo searches for lost owl

APPLE VALLEY, Minn. (AP) — The Minnesota Zoo is searching for a lost owl. KFGO reports that the zoo's Eurasian eagle owl named Gladys flew away during a routine exercise and training session earlier this month and didn't return. Zoo staff believe Gladys is probably still within the zoo's 485-acre, heavily forested grounds. They're asking the public to keep an eye out for her. She would be tough to miss. Eurasian owls are among the largest owls in the world, with piercing orange eyes and six-foot wingspans. Zoo staff say Gladys doesn't pose a threat to public safety but anyone who sees her should call their local police department. 

The Associated Press