Skip to content
Join our Newsletter
Join our Newsletter

Take two for Sabo

He was last election's "bubble boy," coming in eighth in the voting for school trustees, but this year Don Sabo is hoping to burst his way into one of the board's seven spots.

He was last election's "bubble boy," coming in eighth in the voting for school trustees, but this year Don Sabo is hoping to burst his way into one of the board's seven spots.

The second-time candidate speaks passionately about two of his platform issues: a more inclusive board and improving aboriginal education.

In District 57, he said that only 56 per cent of aboriginal students who enter Grade 8 end up graduating high school. Compare that to the 81 per cent of non-aboriginals in the Prince George school system who get their diploma.

"That's unacceptable. Unfortunately the school district is receiving a failing grade in the area of aboriginal education," said Sabo, adding the reaction might be different if 56 per cent were the norm. "Parents would be screaming. There would be people that would be losing their jobs."

The mechanisms are already in place said Sabo, pointing to the Aboriginal Education Board.

"We just need to be a little more responsive and inclusive as far as their education goes," he said, adding the district needs to make progress on two - unsigned - local education agreements between it and First Nations.

Sabo, who is a Status Indian, said he could be a good liaison for that process partly because he has negotiated local education agreements on behalf of First Nations before.

Sabo also sat on the School District Parent Advisory Council for six years and was chair for three when the district underwent the school closures. He's also served on the boards of the Prince George Native Friendship Centre and the YMCA.

"That's where I best fit," said Sabo of his various board positions. "I'm fairly outspoken and I'm very confident in the way I present myself. I think that is what's needed with the school district."

Funding has been a problem in the district as long as he's been involved, and when it comes to number-crunching, Sabo said he can turn to work as a consultant who specializes in human resource management. Sabo holds an associate degree in business administration and pointed to experience in strategic and operational planning as tools that would prove useful.

Although Sabo lives in Prince George, he feels strongly the board should better reflect the full borders of its responsibility - setting aside two of the seven seats for the Robson Valley and Mackenzie.

"I just feel it would make for a stronger board if you had individuals who actually came from those areas that represented them," said Sabo, whose son goes to Prince George Secondary School. "Then you're truly looking at a district approach."

No one has taken the lead on that he said - yet.

"It's something that I don't think anybody's thought of. I want to affect some change."




Comments